doubleXposure Presents underXposed Ep. 6: Who Owns Public Art?

In 1972, the City of Seattle passed one of the first public art ordinances in the country.

The new law mandated that 1% of every public construction project go to fund art or design for that project.


Almost a half-century later, Seattle owns hundreds of artworks, from murals to custom-made manhole covers.

And private developers, like the owners of the new Climate Pledge Arena, worked with the City to commission public art for their venue. Most recently, the AIDS Memorial Pathway opened, featuring significant large installations, and the downtown waterfront and seawall also will boast permanent art by a number of creatives.


Who owns this art? And who's in charge of maintaining it? To find some answers, Marcie talked to Calandra Childers, the Deputy Director of Seattle's Office of Arts and Culture.




Land Buoy Bells by Stephen Vitiello, Pier 62 Floating Dock. Image courtesy of Waterfront Seattle


IN THIS WAY WE LOVED ONE ANOTHER by Storme Webber, AIDS Memorial Pathway.

Image courtesy of Storme Webber, photo by Mel Ponder


andimgonnamisseverybody by Christopher Paul Jordan, AIDS Memorial Pathway. image credit April Jingco




ABOUT THIS EPISODE'S GUEST


Calandra Childers oversees the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture's investments in artists, cultural organizations, and the Seattle community through public art commissions, grantmaking, and partnerships with a focus on community development and the equitable allocation of resources. Most recently she oversaw the launch of ARTS at King Street Station, a new 8,000-square-foot free cultural hub, programmed by and for the community. Calandra has two decades of public engagement, communications, and policy experience working with non-profit and government agencies including the cities of Seattle and Renton, Seattle Art Museum, and the Renton Chamber of Commerce. A graduate of Whitman College, she volunteers with the King-Snohomish County YWCA and the Rainier Valley Food Bank and enjoys outdoor adventures with her husband and dogs. Calandra Childers oversees the Office’s cultural investments in artists, cultural organizations, and the Seattle community through public art commissions, grantmaking, and partnerships with a focus on community development and the equitable allocation of resources. Most recently she oversaw the launch of ARTS at King Street Station, a new 8,000-square-foot free cultural hub, programmed by and for the community. Calandra has two decades of public engagement, communications, and policy experience working with non-profit and government agencies including the cities of Seattle and Renton, Seattle Art Museum, and the Renton Chamber of Commerce. A graduate of Whitman College, she volunteers with the King-Snohomish County YWCA and the Rainier Valley Food Bank and enjoys outdoor adventures with her husband and dogs.